Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg Launches ‘Equal Pay’ Campaign for Women

Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg Launches ‘Equal Pay’ Campaign for Women

Sheryl Sandberg

 

Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg’s LeanIn.org has launched an “equal pay” campaign that claims “women are still paid 20 percent less than men, on average, in the United States.”

The campaign, which launches on Tuesday, also claims on their site that “Black and Hispanic women are paid even less” before offering women 20% off discounts for a range of services in protest.

Several companies have partnered with the campaign, including the popular ride-sharing app Lyft, which will donate 20% of revenue to “organizations that serve women and families” on April 4.

“At Lyft, we celebrate a diverse and inclusive culture, and we participate to make change happen — whether that’s at work or in the car,” the company wrote in a post on their website. “That’s why we’re teaming up with LeanIn.Org on their #20PercentCounts campaign and donating 20% of proceeds from rides taken between 8 AM and 6 PM on April 4 to organizations that serve women and families, including Dress for Success®, Feeding America, Boys & Girls Clubs of America, and AAUW.”

P&G, whose brands include Gillette, Pantene, Always, and Secret, will also be offering a rebate on their products.

“Women on average are paid 20% less than men — and when you look at the data by race and ethnicity, it is even worse: black women are paid 37% less, and Hispanic women are paid 46% less,” claim P&G on their website. “To raise awareness about the gender pay gap, P&G is offering a 20% rebate via pre-paid card on $50 worth of P&G products.”

“P&G believes in equal pay for women. Through our brands, and as a company, we aspire to help build a world free from gender bias,” they continued. “We’re proud to support this campaign to raise awareness of the pay gap with LeanIn.Org.”

Despite the campaign’s claims that women are routinely paid less than men, it is against the law for employers to discriminate based on sex and has been since 1963.

Claims that women are paid less than men have frequently been dismissed by economic experts, journalists, and scholars.